Aug 8, 2020

The Latest Issue of the Review of Biblical Literature

The latest issue of Review of Biblical Literature is out. Reviews can be accessed by clicking the links below but unfortunately you must be a SBL member.

Alan H. Cadwallader, The Politics of the Revised Version: A Tale of Two New Testament Revision Companies
Reviewed by Geoffrey R. Treloar

John F. Evans, You Shall Know That I Am Yahweh: An Inner-biblical Interpretation of Ezekiel’s Recognition Formula
Reviewed by Julie Galambush

Paula Fredriksen and Jesper Svartvik, eds., Krister among the Jews and Gentiles: Essays in Appreciation of the Life and Work of Krister Stendahl
Reviewed by Richard Horsley

Susanne Gillmayr-Bucher and Maria Häusl, eds., Prayers and the Construction of Israelite Identity
Reviewed by Brian Rainey

Gary N. Knoppers, Judah and Samaria in Postmonarchic Times: Essays on Their Histories and Literatures
Reviewed by Lisbeth S. Fried

M. David Litwa, How the Gospels Became History: Jesus and Mediterranean Myths
Reviewed by Alan Kirk

Joel Marcus, John the Baptist in History and Theology
Reviewed by Rivka Nir

Mark D. Nanos, Reading Paul within Judaism: Collected Essays of Mark D. Nanos, Vol. 1
Reviewed by J. Thomas Hewitt

Gregorio del Olmo Lete, The Private Archives of Ugarit: A Functional Analysis
Reviewed by Joseph Lam

Jack Shechter, The Idea of Monotheism: The Evolution of a Foundational Concept
Reviewed by James W. Haring

James P. Ware, Paul’s Theology in Context: Creation, Incarnation, Covenant, and Kingdom
Reviewed by Jonathan More

Lindsay C. Watson, Magic in Ancient Greece and Rome
Reviewed by Michael V. Flowers

Aug 7, 2020

The Dead Sea Scrolls in Recent Scholarship

You can now access the presentations from the recent conference, "The Dead Sea Scrolls in Recent Scholarship" here.

Aug 6, 2020

Psalm 24 Links

I have been working on a commentary on the Psalms. I have decided to compile some helpful links that I discovered during my research. It includes a mix of exegetical and sermonic links. Here is what I have for Psalm 24 (in no particular order). Feel free to mention any that you find helpful in the comments section.

Spokane Bible Church: http://www.spokanebiblechurch.com/books/psalm-24

Literary analysis of Psalm 24: http://psalmsstudy.com/psalms-literary-analysis-by-chapter/literary-analysis-psalm-24-mount-adonai

Analysis by C. J. Labuschagne: https://www.labuschagne.nl/ps024.pdf William Barrick’s notes: https://drbarrick.org/files/studynotes/Psalms/Ps_024.pdf


Lee Irons on Standing with the Lord (Ps 24:4): https://zondervanacademic.com/blog/standing-with-the-lord-ps-244

Aug 5, 2020

Lessons from Samson

Brooks Waldron has a helpful post here that looks more deeply than some treatments of Samson in the book of Judges.

Aug 4, 2020

Free eBook: After Crucifixion

Wipf and Stock is offering a free eBook copy of After Crucifixion by Craig Keen. The offer is only good until August 21 so you have to act quickly. Here are the instructions to get your copy.

1. Click on this link
2. Click "ADD TO CART" on the eBook option
3. Code "ebookfree" is automatically applied within the shopping cart
4. Upon checkout completion, you will receive a confirmation email with instructions of how to download your free eBook

Aug 3, 2020

A New New Testament Backgrounds Resource

Years ago, Bruce Longenecker's Lost Letters of Pergamum was a required text for a New Testament Introduction class for which I was a teaching assistant. Then some time after that Intervarsity Press began publishing a series of books with the title A Week in the Life of . . . . These volumes were an attempt to familiarize readers with the Greco-Roman backgrounds of the New Testament through fictional, but historically-accurate, accounts. The fictional stories are a means of introducing material in a creative and memorable way.

In a similar vein, Dr. Christopher Stanley, a professor at
St. Bonaventure University, has written two volumes of a projected trilogy set in Roman Asia Minor about, "A slave without a past. A master without a future. A journey of discovery that will forever change the lives of both men." While I haven't had a chance to finish either volume, what I have read so far seems very promising.

The books are accompanied by a very nice website here where you can order the book through Amazon and access free supplementary resources, such as plot summaries, commentary, etc. The links alone are well worth a visit. You can also peruse the books by downloading the first five chapters here

So if you are still looking for some summer reading or maybe ways to introduce students or church members to New Testament backgrounds you might want to check these volumes out.

https://www.aslavesstory.com

Aug 2, 2020

"Son"

My friend Mathew Tanner has composed and performed a wonderful song called, "Son." The song begins with David's response to the death of Absalom and moves to the death of Jesus. It is not strictly an exercise in typology but it is an interesting move biblically and beautifully done musically. I encourage you to check it out. You can listen to the song, watch the video, or purchase a copy of the song here.

https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/mathewtanner/son?fbclid=IwAR1oAHcmp0A0CAdvtGU1xETxoTeNHLRqLx35XBCB8YBoZeIgfsMbJg38m14

Aug 1, 2020

The Latest Issue of the Review of Biblical Literature

The latest issue of Review of Biblical Literature is out. Reviews can be accessed by clicking the links below but unfortunately you must be a SBL member.

Walter Ameling, Hannah M. Cotton, Werner Eck, Avner Ecker, Benjamin Isaac, Alla Kushnir-Stein, Haggai Misgav, Jonathan Price, Peter Weiß, and Ada Yardeni, eds., Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palestinae, Volume 4: Iudaea/Idumaea
Reviewed by Lester L. Grabbe

Daniel Castelo and Robert W. Wall, The Marks of Scripture: Rethinking the Nature of the Bible
Reviewed by J. Michael Thigpen

Bart van Egmond, Augustine’s Early Thought on the Redemptive Function of Divine Judgment
Reviewed by Evgenia Moiseeva

Susanne Gillmayr-Bucher and Maria Häusl, eds., Prayers and the Construction of Israelite Identity
Reviewed by Carol A. Newsom

Jordan Guy, United in Exile, Reunited in Restoration: The Chronicler’s Agenda
Reviewed by Yigal Levin

John R. Levison, The Holy Spirit before Christianity
Reviewed by Richard S. Briggs

Matthew McAffee, Life and Mortality in Ugaritic: A Lexical and Literary Study
Reviewed by Timothy Hogue

Michael J. Morris, Warding Off Evil: Apotropaic Tradition in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Synoptic Gospels
Reviewed by Archie T. Wright

V. George Shillington, James and Paul: The Politics of Identity at the Turn of the Ages
Reviewed by James Hanson

Paul T. Sloan, Mark 13 and the Return of the Shepherd: The Narrative Logic of Zechariah in Mark
Reviewed by Barry L. Blackburn

Bradley K. Storin, Self-Portrait in Three Colors: Gregory of Nazianzus’s Epistolary Autobiography
Reviewed by B. Lee Blackburn Jr.

Leonard J. Swidler, Three Jesus Certitudes: Pacifism, Feminism, and the Birth of Christianity
Reviewed by James F. McGrath

Jonathan R. Trotter, The Jerusalem Temple in Diaspora Jewish Practice and Thought during the Second Temple Period
Reviewed by Benjamin D. Gordon

Antoinette Clark Wire, 2 Corinthians
Reviewed by Annelies Moeser

Jennifer S. Wyant, Beyond Mary or Martha: Reclaiming Ancient Models of Discipleship
Reviewed by Jennifer Knust

Free Logos Book for August: History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel, 3rd ed.

The free Logos Book for the Month for June is History and Theology in the Fourth Gospel, 3rd edition (New Testament Library). You can also purchase 1 Peter (Hermeneia) by Paul Achtemeier, The Book of Exodus (Old Testament Library) by Brevard Childs, and Daniel (Hermeneia) by John J. Collins, and the two-volume Theology of the Old Testament (Old Testament Library) by Walter Eichrodt for $1.99, $3.99, $5.99, and $9.99 respectively. While you are at it, you can register for a chance to win the 33-volume Westminster Bible Companion Series. For all these offers, go to the Logos' Free Book of Month page here.

Jul 31, 2020

To Cite or Not

Recently a prominent biblical scholar was convicted of possessing child pornography. A number of years ago I was tasked with reviewing a book that was part of a major commentary series. As I was looking for material on the author to include in the review, I found that he had also been convicted of a similar crime. A decision was made not to include that as part of the review. I still wonder whether that was the right decision. The issue of whether to interact with and/or cite works from tainted authors was also part of an online conversation that I had a few days ago. For some, the issue is straightforward and clear-cut. But I for one, find it more complicated. The fact is, every human author has shortcomings of some kind, albeit some are considerably more serious than others. This editorial by Mary Beard raises some of the complexities of the issues involved. In the end, I feel that it is a judgment call involving a variety of factors that could go either way. One thing I am sure of though, sin always makes things more complicated.

Jul 30, 2020

Matthew 14: The Feeding of the 5,000

Ian Paul has a good post here on Matthew's account of the feeding of the 5,000.

University of Facebook

Seen on Facebook.

Jul 29, 2020

Teaching 1 Chronicles

Nancy Guthrie talks to Richard Pratt about teaching 1 Chronicles here.

Jul 28, 2020

Psalm Songs

Brett McCracken lists seven different musical renditions of eight different psalms (19, 23, 46, 73, 90, 119, 121, 131) here. I was aware of some but not all of these. I created a Spotify playlist devoted to Psalm songs a while back and hope to add some of these.

Jul 27, 2020

Carta Books on Sale

Hendrickson Academic is offering Carta titles at a 60% discount here. Note that this sale is only good from July 27-31 so you will need to act quickly. 

Reconstructing Solomon’s Temple

Madeleine Mumcuoglu and Yosef Garfinkel have a nice article here trying to envision the architectural features of Solomon's temple based on archaeological discoveries.

Jul 25, 2020

The Latest Issue of the Review of Biblical Literature

The latest issue of Review of Biblical Literature is out. Reviews can be accessed by clicking the links below but unfortunately you must be a SBL member.

Maxime Allard, Emmanuel Durand, and Marie de Lovinfosse, eds., Fins et commencements, Renvois et interactions: Mélanges offerts à Michel Gourgues
Reviewed by Jean-François Racine

Brian J. Arnold, Justification in the Second Century
Reviewed by Chris Kugler

Ruth Ebach and Martin Leuenberger, eds., Tradition(en) im alten Israel: Konstruktion, Transmission und Transformation
Reviewed by Peter Porzig

Benedikt Eckhardt, ed., Private Associations and Jewish Communities in the Hellenistic and Roman Cities
Reviewed by John S. Kloppenborg

Mari Joerstad, The Hebrew Bible and Environmental Ethics: Humans, Nonhumans, and the Living Landscape
Reviewed by Margaret M. Daly-Denton

Ralph J. Korner, The Origin and Meaning of Ekklēsia in the Early Jesus Movement
Reviewed by James R. Harrison

David G. Peterson, Commentary on Romans
Reviewed by Andrew B. Spurgeon

Jens Schröter, Simon Butticaz, and Andreas Dettwiler, eds., Receptions of Paul in Early Christianity: The Person of Paul and His Writings through the Eyes of His Early Interpreters
Reviewed by Benjamin A. Edsall

Nicole L. Tilford, ed., Women and the Society of Biblical Literature
Reviewed by Alice Ogden Bellis

James W. S. Yansen Jr., Daughter Zion’s Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Reading of the Book of Lamentations
Reviewed by Barbara Bakke Kaiser

Jul 24, 2020

Free Credo Course: Bibliology and Hermeneutics

You can get free video and audio of a bibliology and hermeneutics course here.

Jul 23, 2020

Psalm 23 Links

I have been working on a commentary on the Psalms. I have decided to compile some helpful links that I discovered during my research. It includes a mix of exegetical and sermonic links. Here is what I have for Psalm 23 (in no particular order). Feel free to mention any that you find helpful in the comments section. 

Spokane Bible Church: http://www.spokanebiblechurch.com/books/psalm-23

Literary analysis of Psalm 23: http://psalmsstudy.com/psalms-literary-analysis-by-chapter/literary-analysis-psalm-23

Ray Stedman., “The Shepherd Psalm,” Psalm 23: https://www.raystedman.org/old-testament/psalms/the-shepherd-psalm

Analysis by C. J. Labuschagne: https://www.labuschagne.nl/ps023.pdf

William Barrick’s notes: https://drbarrick.org/files/studynotes/Psalms/Ps_023.pdf

“The Good Shepherd” David Klingler: https://voice.dts.edu/chapel/the-good-shepherd-klingler-david-r

John Piper, The Shepherd, the Host, and the Highway Patrol: https://www.desiringgod.org/messages/the-shepherd-the-host-and-the-highway-patrol

Jul 22, 2020

New Old Resource on the Book of Ruth

I have noted the ministry of Rob Bradshaw and is website before. Rob is making a number of out-of-copyright biblical studies volumes available in PDF. He just noted this one, The Book of Ruth. The Hebrew Text with Grammatical Notes and Vocabulary by Archibald Robert Stanley Kennedy available here. I just quickly scanned through it and it looks helpful for those that have studied Hebrew.

Jul 21, 2020

"Contradictions" in Proverbs

Readers of the Book of Proverbs are sometimes surprised when they read Proverbs 26:4-5 since the divinely inspired advice seems to be contradictory.

4 Answer not a fool according to his folly,
      lest you be like him yourself.
5 Answer a fool according to his folly,
      lest he be wise in his own eyes.

But in reality this reflects the complexities of life. Secular wisdom reflects this. For example, one might be told, "he who hesitates is lost" or "haste makes waste." Can both be true? Many would probably say, "yes" because one might relate this circumstance while the other to another circumstance. Yet the struggle is real. Raymond C. Van Leeuwen also notes.
Modernity has objected most to the unscientific, contradictory character of proverbs. But it is precisely the ability of proverbs to contradict one another that lends them their versatility and power. Rather than being a defect, this is essential to the genre. A proverb, even when couched in a universal form, is not a universal absolute, like the law of gravity or the speed of light. Proverbs are diverse and contradictory because human life is contradictory and diverse.
Raymond C. Van Leeuwen, “In Praise of Proverbs,” in Pledges of Jubilee: Essays on the Arts and Culture in Honor of Calvin G. Seerveld, ed. Lambert Zuidervaart and Henry Luttdchuizen (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995), 318.